Please wait while loading your Bulletin

Panorama Resources
Current Issue : #2018-1
  • Resources

    Guidelines for investigation of suspicious biological events

    World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), March 2018.

    To address the lack of standards for biothreat and disaster response in many countries, an OIE ad hoc group has drafted guidelines on biothreat reduction... More information... Download the Guidelines for investigation of suspicious biological events

    Online version

  • Resources

    OIE biological threat reduction strategy

    In meeting its mandate to improve animal health, veterinary public health, and animal welfare worldwide, the OIE takes the threat posed by accidental and deliberate release of animal pathogens very seriously. The OIE’s strategy for bio-threat reduction focuses on strengthening, enhancing, and developing cross-links between existing health systems. Online version

    OIE, October 2015

  • Resources

    Recommendations of the First OIE Global Conference on Biological Threat Reduction

    Final Report

    The OIE hosted the first Global Conference on Biological Threat Reduction in Paris, 30 June – 2 July 2015. For the purposes of the Conference, ‘Biological Threats’ or ‘Biothreats’ are threats that result from or are exacerbated by infectious diseases of animals (including zoonoses) which may arise from natural or manmade disasters, laboratory accidents or from the deliberate manipulation or release of pathogens. The Conference, which was held in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO), brought together world leading scientists, educators, and key decision makers from international organisations and national governments. The participants who represented the public health, animal health, ecosystem health, and security sectors came from more than 80 countries. Read the recommendations of the conference...

    Online version

  • Resources

    Recommendations of the Second OIE Global Conference on Biological Threat Reduction

    Final Report

    Thanks to the generous support of the Government of Canada; the Government of the United Kingdom; the European Union; and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency of the United States of America, the OIE organised the 2nd Global Conference on Biological Threat Reduction in Ottawa, Canada on 31 October – 2 November 2017. The Conference hosted over 300 participants from 70 countries who were professionals from relevant international organisations, official National Delegates of OIE Member Countries, leading scientific experts, donors, and stakeholders from animal production and trade, animal health and welfare, public health, law enforcement and security communities. Read the recommendations of the conference...

    Online version

  • Resources

    Proceedings of the first OIE Global Conference on Biological Threat Reduction

    29.7 × 21 cm 186 pp. ISBN 978-92-95108-49-8 Price: EUR 30

    The first OIE Global Conference on Biological Threat Reduction was convened in 2015 in close collaboration with WHO, to put biological threat reduction on the agenda of Veterinary Services in the OIE Member Countries; strengthen links between the health, animal health and the security sector; promote international human and animal healt frameworks as a key to reducing biological threats; and develop a road map focused on enhancing and coordinating existing mechanisms for outreach ant the strengthening of health systems.

    These proceedings include presentations form 34 speakers, including representatives of international organisations, national governments, policy and decision makers, OIE reference centers and donors as well as experts on sciences and economic applied studies. Order here...  
  • Resources

    Biological disasters of animal origin

    Scientific and Technical Review, Vol. 25 (1)

    Coordinator: M. Hugh-Jones Trilingual publication 2006 29.7 x 21 cm 464 pages ISBN 92-9044-661-7 Price: EUR 50

    It is the efficiency with which we plan for and confront traditional and emerging disease outbreaks that will predict our ability and confidence in tackling intentional outbreaks if, when, and where they occur. This means that planning and training must depend on valid models. To prevent public panic, communications must be transparent. Laboratory support must be able to respond to surge demands as well as forensic investigations. These and other crucial dimensions such as compliance of Veterinary Services with OIE standards, early detection and rapid response to outbreaks are covered by recognised experts in this issue of the Scientific and Technical Review.

    Order here

  • Resources

    OIE guidance on biosafety and biosecurity in veterinary laboratories and animal facilities

    Biosafety and biosecurity: Standard for managing biological risk in the veterinary laboratory and animal facilities

    Chapter 1.1.4. of the Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals. Version adopted in May 2015.

    Online version...
  • Resources

    Emerging zoonoses and pathogen of public health concern

    Scientific and Technical Review, Vol. 23 (2)

    Scientific and Technical Review, Vol. 23 (2) This issue of the Scientific and Technical Review describes and explains a number of important emerging zoonoses and the factors that have both created their emergence and challenged national Veterinary Services, and the OIE itself, to become more engaged and responsive to these important contemporary problems. It also highlights the dangers of the constant adaptability of pathogens to survive and infect populations of animals and people and rapidly move between these host populations. Order here...
  • Resources

    United Nations Secretary-General’s Mechanism for Investigation of Alleged Use of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    The United Nations Secretary-General’s Mechanism to carry out prompt investigations in response to allegations brought to his attention concerning the possible use of chemical and bacteriological (biological) and toxin weapons was developed in the late 1980s. Triggered by a request from any United Nations Member State, the Secretary-General is authorized to launch an investigation including dispatching a fact-finding team to the site(s) of the alleged incident(s) and to report to all United Nations Member States. This is to ascertain in an objective and scientific manner facts of alleged violations of the 1925 Geneva Protocol, which bans the use of chemical and biological weapons, or other relevant rules of customary international law. Online version...